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Review | from http://www.renneslechateaubooks.info/

A useful introduction to the world of Rennes-le-Chateau and its many associated mysteries. This book covers inter alia Jewish, Christian and Gnostic scripture, the idea that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married, had a family and lived in France, the Ark of the Covenant, the Crusades, the Priory of Sion, Cathars, Templars and Hospitallers, The Copper Scroll, Rex Deus, alchemy, Rosslyn, Oak Island and Opus Dei.

Although some of the information is reliable - for example that the mainstream western Church has selected, edited, "interpreted" and suppressed ancient texts for its own ends - there are no footnotes and therefore no way to judge the reliability of most of the information given.

There is no central thesis and no conclusion. In fact, chapters of the book appear to be uncritical synopses of the books listed in the bibliography. Despite this, The Secret History of Christianity is still a good read for those unfamiliar with the world of RLC mysteries and conspiracies.

 

Review by Margaret - Blackwells Books 

The author has done a lot of research to present this book as a readable, can't put down piece of literature. I am converted to believing that Jesus and Mary Magdelene were partners in a relationship. The history of the Templars and their involvement with the Holy Grail its all here, this book has it all. Excellent reading.

 

Review by Brunhilde - Blackwells Books

The author has written a well researched book that I read from cover to cover without getting bored. The facts given in the book explain all the mysteries that Dan Brown raised in the Da Vinci Codes. I now understand the relationship between Jesus and the Magdelane was possibly a royal wedding. Also Saunierre was a real person who possibly blackmailed the Church with a secret thet he uncovered at Rennes le Chateau. All in all a good read.

 

Review by Danielle Browne | 23rd October 2008

My namesake wrote the best seller 'The Da Vinci Code', This book by Malcolm Brocklehurst seems to answer many of the issues and mysteries raised by Dan Brown. I found this book a good basic guide to someone who is starting out to search for the truth of The Holy Grail. I can 100 per cent recommend this book.

 

Review by Danielle Browne | 4th October 2008

A mind blowing revelation of the mysteries raised by the Da Vinci codess, I couldn't put this book down, it is written in laymens terms and i am now a converted person into the beleif that Jesus was married to Mary magdalene. The book the Secret History of Christianity is well researched and chapters are wide ranging from revelations about the Lost Ark of the covenant and the Templar treasure to Rosslyn and the Holy Grail.I couldn't put the book down and it deserves to become a best seller.

 

Article from MALTA TODAY by John B. Pace | Victoria, Gozo | 22nd June 2008

The Antichrist does not rest and used your paper of Sunday 15 June for a free advert of his deception. In an ordinary letter published in your paper a certain Majinka Brocklehurst advertised a book (including a colour picture of the cover) by a certain Malcolm Brocklehurst, who appears to be a close relative of hers. As described by her, this book ‘The Secret History of Christianity’, appears to attempt a serious perpetuation of the lies and malicious insinuations in the fictional book, ‘The Da Vinci Code’. Apparently, the book’s author is cashing in on the financial success of the blasphemous book his is based on, while obviously the letter writer has tricked you into allowing an unpaid advertisement of a possibly plagiarised book likely to be offensive to the majority of the Maltese. This is not good for your paper’s reputation and certainly not good for your business.

 

Review by Scott Border | 22nd May 2008

The author covers the subject well, certain areas could of been covered in more detail, but overall a well thought out book leabing the reader wanting to search for more.

 

Review by Mr Majinka | 19 May 2008

As the author of 'THE SECRET HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY' I am biased in my review of MY book. However taking a consensus of opinion from the correspondence I have received, I can only reiterate what what has been written to me. 1) 'A damn good read it has opened my eyes.' 2) 'A well researched book for the layman' 3) From a French website: Quote 'The book is a useful introduction to the world of Rennes-le-Chateau and its many associated mysteries. This book covers inter alia Jewish, Christian and Gnostic scripture, the idea that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were married, had a family and lived in France, the Ark of the Covenant, the Crusades, the Priory of Sion, Cathars, Templars and Hospitallers, The Copper Scroll, Rex Deus, alchemy, Rosslyn, Oak Island and Opus Dei. Although some of the information is reliable - for example that the mainstream western Church has selected, edited, "interpreted" and suppressed ancient texts for its own ends - there are no footnotes and therefore no way to judge the reliability of most of the information given. Despite this, The Secret History of Christianity is still a good read for those unfamiliar with the world of Rennes le Chateau mysteries and conspiracies.

 

Review from http://www.thisislancashire.co.uk | Sunday 23rd March 2008

A Cleveleys' writer is hoping the Da Vinci effect will boost interest in his latest book, which has been 23 years in the making. Malcolm Brocklehurst, 73, (pictured) will have his controversial book, The Secret History of Christianity, published on April 13. The book touches on themes of the Christian church, templars, masons and the Holy Grail, themes familiar to those in Dan Brown's multi-million selling novel, The Da Vinci Code. Yet Malcolm's work on the book and interest in the subject pre-dates Brown's work by many years. Malcolm, of North Drive, said: "I was contracting in Toulouse France in the aerospace industry in 1985 when I read the best seller The Holy Blood, Holy Grail and consequently became interested in the local historical site of Rennes le Chateau. "I conducted detailed research and returned to the subject to write the book over the six years since my retirement. "There is an enormous resurgence of interest in this subject recently with several books and films made. But I'm convinced my theories are different to those previously published." The Toulouse site becomes the centrepiece of the book in which Malcolm puts forward the view of a relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene and alleges the Church of Rome suppressed the marriage of Jesus with the evidence portrayed in codes in the medieval paintings of Botticelli and Leonardo da Vinci. The Secret History of Christianity is Malcolm's first non-fiction book and he also writes poetry and is chairman of Cleveleys' Writers. Malcolm also writes under the pseudonym of Majinka and is writing an historical novel about a family over 400 years from aristocratic Elizabethan England to the Russian Revolution. The Secret History of Christianity will be available from local branches of Waterstones and online book vendors. By Chris Gee »

 

Review from http://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/blackpoolnews | 28 October 2003

MALCOLM Brocklehurst and his wife Mary shed a few tears when Concorde touched down for the final time. After 34 years coasting high above the clouds, the ultimate symbol of grace and luxury, the Queen of the Skies had finally reached her final resting place. Watching the sombre spectacle on TV from their neat Cleveleys semi, Malcolm and Mary said part of their lives had been extinguished along with the death of the supersonic dream. The couple both worked on the Concorde prototype at Filton from 1965 to 1970, Malcolm as a fitter, Mary an electrician. They saw it grow and develop into one of the finest feats of engineering of its time from the middle of a giant hanger near Bristol. But the world's first supersonic passenger plane made its final journey last week, when three of the sleek planes landed at London's Heathrow Airport. "I was in tears," said Malcolm, 68. "So many memories came back, so much nostalgia. Part of my life went when Concorde landed for that final time and it was a sad day to see it consigned to history. "I thought it would go on for another 10 or 15 years but they will never do it again, not in my lifetime." Mary said: "I had a lump in my throat watching it on TV. It was such a special time for all of us and it's sad to see it coming to an end." Malcolm and Mary, who now live on North Drive, moved to Filton to work on the project at the former Brabazan hanger in the mid-1960s, the only hanger big enough to house Concorde. At first there were only 10 of them. At its height, over 4,000 men and women were painstakingly piecing Concorde together. "We had a vague notion of this new aircraft they wanted to build," said Malcolm, who still works part-time at Aerolux Ltd on Chorley Road, Layton. "We were briefed and then we got to work. There were 10 fitters on that first day, then it just grew and grew to over 4,000. As the Concorde prototype developed, so did the interest of the world's media. The workers were allowed to show friends and relatives inside the aircraft – and even the odd member of royalty. "We were working on the flight deck," remembers Malcolm. "And this man was stood over us. I said to a friend 'Who the hell was that?', and he laughed – 'It's King Hussein of Jordan!'" Concorde's death knell began to sound on July 25, 2000 when an Air France Concorde crashed minutes after take-off from the Charles De Gaulle airport in Paris, killing all 109 people on board, plus four on the ground. Royalty Asked about Concorde's demise, Malcolm said: "The Paris crash was terrible. I never thought it could happen and there was nothing wrong with Concorde – it was debris on the runway. But that crash didn't kill it off – it's been in recession since September 11 and has taken some hard knocks. "We never got chance to fly on Concorde – I would have loved it. It was just so special and although Concorde is gone, we've still got our memories. "